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about

The design of Adapter started with a goal shared by many other designers: to create a simple, no-frills sans serif that would appeal to contemporary modernist and post-modernist aesthetics. A straightforward, universal typeface that is easy to use for a wide range of design genres.

We found that modernist sans serifs (or neo-grotesques such as Helvetica or Arial) tend to be used according to two different logics. They are an unobtrusive, basic, or even default choice when used for continuous texts. Yet they can also be selected intentionally to make a strong stylistic statement suggesting minimalism or unaesthetics when used in posters, magazines, or book covers. These are two very different objectives, and we argue they are best addressed with different shapes. That’s why we designed two different typefaces with two different design personalities.

Adapter Text looks as if it were designed by a typographer who cares mostly about ergonomics, ease of reading, and an even rhythm. Emphasized design features, generous spacing, overall openness, and slightly squarish counters that lend themselves well to low resolutions were all made to honour the reading experience.

Adapter Display, on the other hand, was designed by an architect – a lover of symmetry, alignment, impact, and black colour. Its round shapes are rounder and its spiky parts, spikier. It remains casually uninvolved, but it has personality. It is tightly spaced for a striking impact in headlines. The display sizes also permit a wider range of usable weights.

Parts of the same system, Adapter Display and Adapter Text were two separate sets of fonts. But we wanted to keep the system compact. So, we packed the whole range of weights, text and display size-specific variants, and even the italics into a single, lightweight variable font that currently supports Cyrillic, Greek, and Latin – with Arabic and Hebrew coming later this year. A simple, flexible solution.

Read about the development on our blog or download the free trial fonts in the checkout.

Art-direction:
William Montrose,
David Březina

Design:
William Montrose (Latin),
Sláva Jevčinová (Lat., Cyrillic, Greek)

Published: 2019

Language support:
Cyrillic (39 languages)
Greek (1 language)
Latin (120 languages)

Variable font axes:
Optical size (opsz): 4 to 18
Weight (wght): 100 to 900
Slant (slnt): −10 to 0

Adapter is a trade mark of Rosetta Type Foundry s.r.o.

Modern Cyrillic 2019

opentype features

Catalan
Dutch
Uppercase alternates
Case-sensitive variants
Slashed zero
Tabular lining figures
A lot of combinable arrows
Serbian/Macedonian forms (set language or use stylistic sets 7 & 9)
Romanian/Moldavian
Lowercase alternates
Case-sensitive punctuation
Ordinals
Arbitrary fractions
Superiors & inferiors
Bullets & symbols
Bulgarian forms (set language or use stylistic set 8)
Text Latin
120 languages
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Latin (120 languages)
Afar, Afrikaans, Albanian, Asturian/Leonese, Aymara, Azerbaijani/Azeri (Latin), Basque, Belarusian (Latin), Bosnian (Latin), Breton, Catalan, Cebuano, Chamorro, Cornish, Corsican, Crimean Tatar, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch/Flemish, Eastern Frisian, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Faroese, Finnish, French, Friulian, Galician, Ganda, German, Gilbertese, Greenlandic, Hawaiian, Hiligaynon, Hungarian, Icelandic, Ido, Inari Sami, Indonesian, Interlingua, Irish, Italian, Javanese (Latin), Karelian, Kashubian, Kinyarwanda, Kurdish, Ladin, Latin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Lombard, Lower Sorbian, Lule Sami, Luxembourgish, Makhuwa, Malay, Maltese, Manx, Maori, Maori/Rarotongan, Neapolitan, Northern Frisian, Northern Khmer (Latin), Northern Sami, Northern Sotho, Norwegian (Bokmål), Norwegian (Nynorsk), Nyanja/Chichewa, Occitan, Palauan, Pite Sami, Polish, Portuguese, Quechua, Romanian/Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Samoan, Sango, Sardinian, Saterland Frisian, Scottish Gaelic, Serbian/Montenegrin (Latin), Shona, Sicilian, Silesian, Skolt Sami, Slovak, Slovenian, Somali, Southern Sami, Spanish (Castillian), Sundanese (Latin), Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Tagalog (Filipino), Tahitian, Tetum, Tokelau, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Turkish, Turkmen (Latin), Ume Sami, Upper Sorbian, Venetian, Veps, Vietnamese, Wallisian, Walloon, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yapese, Zulu
Display Latin
120 languages
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Latin (120 languages)
Afar, Afrikaans, Albanian, Asturian/Leonese, Aymara, Azerbaijani/Azeri (Latin), Basque, Belarusian (Latin), Bosnian (Latin), Breton, Catalan, Cebuano, Chamorro, Cornish, Corsican, Crimean Tatar, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch/Flemish, Eastern Frisian, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Faroese, Finnish, French, Friulian, Galician, Ganda, German, Gilbertese, Greenlandic, Hawaiian, Hiligaynon, Hungarian, Icelandic, Ido, Inari Sami, Indonesian, Interlingua, Irish, Italian, Javanese (Latin), Karelian, Kashubian, Kinyarwanda, Kurdish, Ladin, Latin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Lombard, Lower Sorbian, Lule Sami, Luxembourgish, Makhuwa, Malay, Maltese, Manx, Maori, Maori/Rarotongan, Neapolitan, Northern Frisian, Northern Khmer (Latin), Northern Sami, Northern Sotho, Norwegian (Bokmål), Norwegian (Nynorsk), Nyanja/Chichewa, Occitan, Palauan, Pite Sami, Polish, Portuguese, Quechua, Romanian/Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Samoan, Sango, Sardinian, Saterland Frisian, Scottish Gaelic, Serbian/Montenegrin (Latin), Shona, Sicilian, Silesian, Skolt Sami, Slovak, Slovenian, Somali, Southern Sami, Spanish (Castillian), Sundanese (Latin), Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Tagalog (Filipino), Tahitian, Tetum, Tokelau, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Turkish, Turkmen (Latin), Ume Sami, Upper Sorbian, Venetian, Veps, Vietnamese, Wallisian, Walloon, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yapese, Zulu
Text Cyrillic
39 languages
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Cyrillic (39 languages)
Abaza, Adyghe, Avaric/Avar, Bashkir, Belarusian (Cyrillic), Bosnian (Cyrillic), Bulgarian, Buriat, Chechen, Chuvash, Dargwa, Dungan, Erzya, Ingush, Kabardian, Kalmyk, Kara-Kalpak, Kazakh, Kirghiz, Komi, Komi-Permyak, Kumyk, Lezghian, Macedonian, Moksha, Mongolian, Nanai, Nogai, Ossetian, Russian, Rusyn, Serbian/Montenegrin (Cyrillic), Tabassaran, Tajik, Tatar, Turkmen (Cyrillic), Tuvinian, Ukrainian, Uzbek
Display Cyrillic
39 languages
Close
Cyrillic (39 languages)
Abaza, Adyghe, Avaric/Avar, Bashkir, Belarusian (Cyrillic), Bosnian (Cyrillic), Bulgarian, Buriat, Chechen, Chuvash, Dargwa, Dungan, Erzya, Ingush, Kabardian, Kalmyk, Kara-Kalpak, Kazakh, Kirghiz, Komi, Komi-Permyak, Kumyk, Lezghian, Macedonian, Moksha, Mongolian, Nanai, Nogai, Ossetian, Russian, Rusyn, Serbian/Montenegrin (Cyrillic), Tabassaran, Tajik, Tatar, Turkmen (Cyrillic), Tuvinian, Ukrainian, Uzbek
Text Greek
1 language
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Greek (1 language)
Greek (Monotonic)
Display Greek
1 language
Close
Greek (1 language)
Greek (Monotonic)
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Art-direction and design (Latin): William Montrose

William Montrose is a type designer with a background in marketing and advertising. His interest in typography led him to Berlin (FontShop International), Reading (MA Typeface Design) and London (Dalton Maag).

William worked on custom and retail typefaces and marketing at Rosetta. He is now a partner in an independent project Kilotype.

Design (Latin, Cyrillic, Greek): Sláva Jevčinová

Sláva Jevčinová is a type and graphic designer from Slovakia. She holds an MA in type design from the Type and Media programme at The Royal Academy of Art in The Hague as well as an MA in graphic design from J. E. Purkyně University in Czech Republic. After an internship at Mota Italic in Berlin she specialised in TrueType hinting at Fontwerk. She has been working independently since 2013 and regularly collaborates with Rosetta as hinting specialist and type designer.

Art-direction: David Březina

David Březina is the managing director at Rosetta. While you may know him as the designer of the award-winning type family Skolar, he has also worked on custom typefaces for Adobe, Linotype (Monotype), Microsoft, Google, and others. So far, he has designed typefaces for Cyrillic, Greek, Gujarati, Devanagari, and various extensions of Latin. David holds a Master’s degree in computer science from Masaryk University in Brno (Czechia) and an MA in Typeface Design and PhD from the University of Reading (UK). His cross-disciplinary PhD thesis studied visual similarity and coherence of characters in typefaces for continuous reading in Latin, Cyrillic, and Devanagari scripts.

He has also been actively involved in writing, presenting, and conducting workshops on type and typography around the world.

Assistance:

Font engineering : Johannes Neumeier
Kerning : Jitka Janečková
Cyrillic consultancy : Maria Doreuli
Greek consultancy : Irene Vlachou